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  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:54 PM
    Back in 1989 Japanese manufacturers informally agreed to a cap of 276 horsepower on domestically produced cars in order to prevent a horsepower war. BoostAddict believes this agreement handicapped Japanese high performance options with ramifications still felt today. In other words, the cap was about as shortsighted as this Bill Gates statement on RAM, '640k is more memory than anyone will ever need.' The Japanese essentially handcuffed themselves and throughout the 90's you may have noticed how many of their cars neatly on paper adhered to this agreement. The 1990 Honda NSX? 270 horsepower. 1992 MKIV Toyota Supra Turbo? 276 horsepower. 1990 Mitsubishi GTO (3000GT)? 276 horsepower. 1994 Subaru WRX STI? 271 horsepower. 1995 Mitsubishi EVO III? 270 horsepower. The Nissan 300ZX? 276 horsepower. While there may not have been anything official other than what the people involved with JAMA (Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association) knew the manufacturers were all respecting the agreement on paper with their outputs. What was the point of this restriction? For one, for there not to be the never ending horsepower arms race we now have and secondly to reduce Japanese road fatalities. For whatever reason the Japanese tied horsepower to road fatalities and did not see the giant error in their logic. Fatalities have fallen in Japanese car accidents from the 80's to today yet horsepower has risen so make of that what you will. This artificial limit led to a tuning arms race. If you could not get the horsepower from the factory, tuners would give you it. This is part of the reason turbo Japanese cars and tuning became popular. Many of the cars were relatively cheap, plentiful, and horsepower was fairly easy to extract from the turbo powerplants. In the case of the Supra, it literally was as easy as pulling a hose. This gave rise to some legendary builds and tuning houses. Look at the output of this stock 1989 Nissan GTR RB26DETT: 260 horsepower at all four wheels is not shabby for a car from 1989 but it also is not much. Especially with competitor's output rising and the Nissan GTR essentially being stuck at that level of output due to the agreement. Now look at this tuned example with bolt on modifications (baseline figure is with a tune): With a Garrett GT3582R turbo, 6Boost exhaust manifold, Turbosmart 50mm external wastegate, Sard 750cc injectors, an upgraded fuel pump, custom exhaust, and a tune output rises to just under 475 wheel horsepower. In other words, another 200 horsepower at the wheels on the stock internals. Any wonder why tuning the GTR became popular? Especially when you can get crazy with it like this 1000+ horsepower example: In 2005 Honda simply felt they could no longer adhere to the horsepower limit and compete. They released a Legend model with a 300 horsepower 3.5 liter V6. Soon other manufacturers followed and the agreement was over. The truth is the majority of them were making cars with more than 276 horses anyway as the R32 dyno shows but they did not want to break the agreement on paper. The Japanese really were the first ones to dramatically sandbag output. All under the guise of supposedly keeping the roads safer when it was improved safety standards doing that regardless of horsepower. It took a long time for the Japanese to truly recover and start producing world class sports cars again. The current GTR of course is pointed to but look at how long it has taken for Honda to produce a new NSX. Toyota still does not have a real Supra successor or high performance sports car on the market (no the LF-A does not count). The good thing is that the Japanese tuning market exploded with the turbo cars barely being pushed from the factory and offering such tuning potential. So, maybe, the agreement was a good thing for enthusiasts. Especially considering the rest of the world ignored it anyway.
    0 replies | 7 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:46 PM
    Back in 1989 Japanese manufacturers informally agreed to a cap of 276 horsepower on domestically produced cars in order to prevent a horsepower war. BoostAddict believes this agreement handicapped Japanese high performance options with ramifications still felt today. In other words, the cap was about as shortsighted as this Bill Gates statement on RAM, '640k is more memory than anyone will ever need.' The Japanese essentially handcuffed themselves and throughout the 90's you may have noticed how many of their cars neatly on paper adhered to this agreement. The 1990 Honda NSX? 270 horsepower. 1992 MKIV Toyota Supra Turbo? 276 horsepower. 1990 Mitsubishi GTO (3000GT)? 276 horsepower. 1994 Subaru WRX STI? 271 horsepower. 1995 Mitsubishi EVO III? 270 horsepower. The Nissan 300ZX? 276 horsepower. While there may not have been anything official other than what the people involved with JAMA (Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association) knew the manufacturers were all respecting the agreement on paper with their outputs. What was the point of this restriction? For one, for there not to be the never ending horsepower arms race we now have and secondly to reduce Japanese road fatalities. For whatever reason the Japanese tied horsepower to road fatalities and did not see the giant error in their logic. Fatalities have fallen in Japanese car accidents from the 80's to today yet horsepower has risen so make of that what you will. This artificial limit led to a tuning arms race. If you could not get the horsepower from the factory, tuners would give you it. This is part of the reason turbo Japanese cars and tuning became popular. Many of the cars were relatively cheap, plentiful, and horsepower was fairly easy to extract from the turbo powerplants. In the case of the Supra, it literally was as easy as pulling a hose. This gave rise to some legendary builds and tuning houses. Look at the output of this stock 1989 Nissan GTR RB26DETT: 260 horsepower at all four wheels is not shabby for a car from 1989 but it also is not much. Especially with competitor's output rising and the Nissan GTR essentially being stuck at that level of output due to the agreement. Now look at this tuned example with bolt on modifications (baseline figure is with a tune): With a Garrett GT3582R turbo, 6Boost exhaust manifold, Turbosmart 50mm external wastegate, Sard 750cc injectors, an upgraded fuel pump, custom exhaust, and a tune output rises to just under 475 wheel horsepower. In other words, another 200 horsepower at the wheels on the stock internals. Any wonder why tuning the GTR became popular? Especially when you can get crazy with it like this 1000+ horsepower example: In 2005 Honda simply felt they could no longer adhere to the horsepower limit and compete. They released a Legend model with a 300 horsepower 3.5 liter V6. Soon other manufacturers followed and the agreement was over. The truth is the majority of them were making cars with more than 276 horses anyway as the R32 dyno shows but they did not want to break the agreement on paper. The Japanese really were the first ones to dramatically sandbag output. All under the guise of supposedly keeping the roads safer when it was improved safety standards doing that regardless of horsepower. It took a long time for the Japanese to truly recover and start producing world class sports cars again. The current GTR of course is pointed to but look at how long it has taken for Honda to produce a new NSX. Toyota still does not have a real Supra successor or high performance sports car on the market (no the LF-A does not count). The good thing is that the Japanese tuning market exploded with the turbo cars barely being pushed from the factory and offering such tuning potential. So, maybe, the agreement was a good thing for enthusiasts. Especially considering the rest of the world ignored it anyway.
    0 replies | 5 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:15 PM
    Hey ArthurL: :text-welcomewave:
    0 replies | 2 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:08 PM
    There we go. I hate the vb attachment system so much. I hate so much about this software. But planes are awesome!
    6 replies | 79 view(s)
  • richpike's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:07 PM
    Not sure - I was doing it from my iPad and I did the "restore saved" content. Maybe that's what messed it up. It worked for me at first. Here they are again:
    6 replies | 79 view(s)
  • m3dragon's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:04 PM
    Bimmerfest 2015 is now in the books. For all those who did not join us for the weekend of fun here is a trip recap of what you missed. Images can bee seen on the photo album here: Video will be posted once edited so stay tuned for that. Sacramento group left promptly at 5:00am from Elk Grove and made the trek to Hollister to meet the other member who signed up for this drive and event. As you can see the weather was rain free and traffic was light for the drive down. On the way to Hollister we somehow timed it perfectly to meet the central valley CA gang on I5. As we drive over under one of the over passes we see them driving over and get on the freeway. This was not planned and I am sure we could not have planned it any better even if we tried. With an hour still left to travel the now bigger group made a quick stop for the restrooms and to stretch our legs. After about 10 minutes we all loaded back up and hit the road to make it to Hollister by 7:30am. Arriving in Hollister around 7:30am we topped our cars off with fuel and waited for the rest of the participants to show up. By 7:40am we had everyone that signed up onsite. We had 21 cars signed up with one drop out who was replaced by one tag along. So we started the day with 21 cars to make the 408 mile trek down to Pasadena. First leg was pretty much traffic free until we hit a local for about 10 mile stretch where they would not pull over. Luckley they turned off towards King City and we were traffic free the rest of the day on the back roads. We hit San Luis Obispo around 11:30am and stopped for lunch at Firestone Grill. We waited about 2 minutes before the pre ordered lunch arrived. They knew were coming and everyone got to experience really good BBQ. So in under 30 minutes we fed a group of 40 people and hit the road. After leaving San Luis Obispo we head south then turned east to drive the last of the twisty roads. We stopped at a town in the middle of nowhere for emergency fuel for a few people. Here we had a scare when one of the participants started driving his wheel started to wobble. We all stopped and found 3 of the 5 studs sheered. So with some team work we were able to get the old studs out and get back on the road. We made it to the hotel around 5:30pm and got everyone checked in for an hour of R&R before we headed to dinner. Saturday we headed to Bimmerfest early and hit some rain. Funny part it was only raining in the mountains and a little spilled over as we got close to the venue. The show has changed a lot over the years. Seems to be lest enthusiasts and a different crowd. That night some of the gang got restless so we made the trek over to Hollywood to head down Hollywood Blvd. After cruising down the blvd and seeing the usual crazy people, we headed to Sunset Blvd. Turning west we made the classic cruise to the ocean where we turned to head back to the hotel. Was a fun few hour run with a bunch of BMW buddies. Sunday the planned drive was canceled as the canyons were driving had rain the night before and was forecasted that morning. It was not worth the risk so we let the group know and made our way home.
    12 replies | 365 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:56 PM
    Why are your first set of attachments invalid? Did you try linking to the attachments?
    6 replies | 79 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:51 PM
    135i08, we appreciate you taking the time to join.
    0 replies | 4 view(s)
  • richpike's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:47 PM
    I'm not military either, but have great admiration for those that are. America truly is the land of the free because of the brave. -Rich
    6 replies | 79 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:41 PM
    Welcome MatildaCal, take a look around, I think you will like what you see.
    0 replies | 5 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:03 PM
    Joca, we appreciate you taking the time to join.
    0 replies | 8 view(s)
  • infliktyd135i's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:54 PM
    Cool. I'm a driver also. That truck has to have a special transmission. When I try to stoplight race cars bobtail I start in 7 or 8th (10 speed) and floor it then slip the clutch to keep boost up, its really hard but if you do it right you can launch hard! But not hard enough to beat a m5 o_O
    5 replies | 306 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:41 PM
    You'd be surprised (no you wouldn't) how often tunes get mislabeled. Regardless, the McLaren and M157 race certainly is interesting.
    16 replies | 312 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:32 PM
    Hey PhilippDam: :text-welcomewave:
    0 replies | 9 view(s)
  • nbrigdan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:19 PM
    I just love the Mulsanne. The Mercedes lost for me when Lieberman said he reached down and felt plastic. At this price point, that's unacceptable. I wouldn't want to have to spend extra to have the interior custom trimmed just so there isn't plastic anywhere.
    7 replies | 155 view(s)
  • nbrigdan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:49 PM
    True, I hadn't considered the race gas angle. The guy who posted it said it was the intermediate tune though, so I didn't consider fueling as a factor.
    16 replies | 312 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:20 PM
    Hey sertstran: :text-welcomewave:
    0 replies | 14 view(s)
  • schwarz996's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:04 PM
    i was saying 2.3sec 0-60ft street tire ... so my meth kit is ramping via the amount of boost ! let say at around 5psi the pump will start flowing and 18 psi+ the pump flow the max it can
    36 replies | 414 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:00 PM
    ^ Those are 5 of the 9 remaining airworthy P-38 Lightnings.
    236 replies | 22602 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:59 PM
    236 replies | 22602 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:44 PM
    That's freaking cool! I really respect the people who serve. I wouldn't last a day taking orders. I just wouldn't.
    6 replies | 79 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:43 PM
    You make a fair point. But I mean aren't they doing 700 whp or so with race gas with bolt ons on the M157?
    16 replies | 312 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:41 PM
    Welcome to a real enthusiast forum SophieXpv8.
    0 replies | 13 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:34 PM
    Welcome to a real enthusiast forum GFGCandice.
    0 replies | 14 view(s)
  • nbrigdan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:26 PM
    I find it very hard to believe that a 650S would fall to bolt on E63 like in the video. When considering aerodynamics and power to weight it would seem the E63 would need at least over 800 BHP. (Using power to weight ratio as a judge, I know, not perfect but decent for a general idea)
    16 replies | 312 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    Try the Special Selection. It's delicious.
    1302 replies | 74753 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    Had these two bad boys yesterday: 2005 Cos D'Estornel and a 2004 Leonetti Reserve. Both are just flat out spectacular and there is not much more to say. I already had a bit to drink when I had the Cos so I didn't sample it's full potential but opening it at 11 PM while playing a game of pool with the family was one of those perfect wines for the perfect time kind of things. Now I need to figure out how to replace these without going broke.
    1302 replies | 74753 view(s)
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