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    • Officially introducing the 2016 Porsche 981 Cayman GT4 model with 385 naturally aspirated horses and a 7:40 Nurburgring time - Manual only

      The speculation can be put to rest. After numerous spyphotos the Porsche Cayman GT4 model is finally here. The specifications match what was expected based on comments from Porsche's head engineer last month. The Cayman GT4 comes with 3.8 liter flat-6 power borrowed from the Carrera S.


      It is of course detuned to protect the 911 Carrera S image and has 'only' 385 horsepower instead of the full 400. Porsche is the master of creating artificial hierarchy and reinforces this artificial positioning by horsepower numbers. They have finally, and significantly, allowed a Cayman to outpower the 911 Carrera though.

      So what did Porsche do here other than give the Cayman the Carrera S engine? They gave the car revised aerodynamics as well as pieces from the 991 GT3. The brakes and suspension are stated by Porsche to consist 'almost entirely' of components from the GT3 model.

      What is notably absent from the 991 GT3 is the PDK dual clutch transmission. The 991 GT3 is offered as PDK only whereas the Cayman GT4 is offered as manual only. Interesting, isn't it? With the GT3 it is understandable as the car is lower volume and the PDK offers superior performance to the manual transmission.

      PorscheBoost believes Porsche is not offering the PDK option as the Cayman GT4 would easily outpace the Carrera S which is offered with PDK as well as the manual transmission. It costs Porsche nothing to add the PDK option as the motor is the same as the Carrera S motor. This is a political decision as they easily have the ability to offer both as they already produce and offer both in the Carrera S.

      The Cayman S and Boxster S of course also use this same transmission with their 3.4 liter flat-6 units borrowed from the 911 Carrera.

      If you want a manual Porsche track car it looks like the Cayman GT4 is the choice. It also helps that it is cheaper than the GT3 at $84,600.00.



















      A New Member of Porsche's GT Family

      The benchmark in its class: the Porsche Cayman GT4


      Atlanta, Feb. 3, 2015 - Porsche's GT family is proud to announce the addition of an exciting new member: the Cayman GT4. This is the first Porsche GT sports car based on the Cayman and features components of the 911 GT3. Clocking a lap time of 7 minutes and 40 seconds on the North Loop of the Nürburgring, the Cayman GT4 earns the same lap time as the 2011 911 GT3 and positions itself as the new benchmark atop its market segment. The Cayman GT4 clearly demonstrates Porsche's dedication and passion to continue to promote truly industry-leading two-door sports cars in the future – sports cars that are developed at the Motorsport department in Weissach.

      The engine, chassis, brakes, and aerodynamic design of the Cayman GT4 are configured for maximum driving dynamics while retaining the versatility and everyday utility that are typical of the two-seater Porsche coupe. Powered by a 385 hp 3.8-liter flat-six engine derived from the 911 Carrera S engine, the Cayman GT4 transmits its power solely through a six-speed manual transmission with dynamic gearbox mounts. Zero to 60 mph is accomplished in 4.2 seconds; its top track speed is 183 mph. The chassis – which features a 30 mm lower ride height and a generously sized brake system – consists almost entirely of components from the 911 GT3.

      Ready for the race track: The first Porsche Cayman with added downforce at both axles
      The exterior of the Cayman GT4 highlights it as a member of the Porsche GT family and provides a clear distinction to related mid-engine coupes. Three pronounced inlet openings at the front and a large fixed rear wing are part of an aerodynamic package which is systematically designed for downforce. Upon request, the performance capabilities of Cayman GT4 can be taken even further. Available options include the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system, full bucket seats made of carbon fiber composite, and a custom Sport Chrono Package featuring a Track Precision app.

      The interior of the Cayman GT4 focuses on maximizing the experience of unfiltered driving enjoyment for both driver and passenger. Standard sport seats, which are upholstered in a combination of leather and Alcantara®, offer excellent lateral support. The new Cayman GT4 sport steering wheel guarantees ideal control and direct steering feedback due to its compact dimensions.

      Technical aspects of this new GT sports car are based on the 911 GT3. As a mid-engine sports car and a prime example of driving dynamics in its class, it follows the conceptual tradition of such cars as the 904 GTS, 911 GT1, Carrera GT and 918 Spyder.

      GT sports cars engineered by Porsche embody the most passionate connection possible between everyday driving and Porsche's competition heritage and highlight the sporty core of the brand: Intelligent Performance.

      The Porsche Cayman GT4 celebrates its world premiere in early March at the Geneva International Motor Show. This vehicle will arrive at U.S. dealers in July 2015. The starting MSRP for the Cayman GT4 is $84,600. MSRP does not include a destination charge of $995.

      This article was originally published in forum thread: Porsche Cayman GT4 Official release started by DavidV View original post
      Comments 19 Comments
      1. Stevenh's Avatar
        Stevenh -
        Wow, I was expecting a sticker north of $100,000 (I'm sure you'll get there very fast with options), but this thing will be a player at $85,000.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Stevenh Click here to enlarge
        Wow, I was expecting a sticker north of $100,000 (I'm sure you'll get there very fast with options), but this thing will be a player at $85,000.
        If they really wanted to make a splash they would have given it PDK and the GT3 mtor. PDK at least but we know they don't want the Cayman stepping all over the Carrera and Carrera S which with PDK it most certainly would.

        I hate how Porsche protects the 911.
      1. BlackJetE90OC's Avatar
        BlackJetE90OC -
        The manual is for all the GT3 guys that complained about the 991 being pdk only.

        Andreas said a pdk isn't out of question down the road. They want to see how the car is received.
      1. leveraged sellout's Avatar
        leveraged sellout -
        I'm sure PDK will be added, you'd be surprised how many people were screaming out for this thing to be manual only...because of course making sure that nobody can have a PDK is really what validates your decision to use older technology...

        Also I wish for this price they had included the power pack, but that is quite an expensive option on that engine so I can see why they didn't. Maybe for a future (imaginary) GT4 RS...

        I'm really glad they made this thing though...I'm sure it will be literally heaven on earth to drive.
      1. Nugs's Avatar
        Nugs -
        I'll take one in blue with the clubsport package please.
        So much want.
      1. bobS's Avatar
        bobS -
        I love it... might be my next car
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by BlackJetE90OC Click here to enlarge
        The manual is for all the GT3 guys that complained about the 991 being pdk only.
        It's politics. They could have done both transmissions out of the gate with no profit loss.
      1. andrew20195's Avatar
        andrew20195 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        If they really wanted to make a splash they would have given it PDK and the GT3 mtor. PDK at least but we know they don't want the Cayman stepping all over the Carrera and Carrera S which with PDK it most certainly would.

        I hate how Porsche protects the 911.
        I don't necessarily think this is the case. As it is, they had to modify the Carrera S engine to fit, and the transmissions between the 911 and Cayman series are quite a bit different because the differentials turn in opposite directions. There may also be size considerations there as well. So if the Cayman GTS PDK isn't rated for the torque output of the GT4 engine, which is likely, since Andreas said they had to use a torque limiter and a dual-mass flywheel for the manual, then they basically have to design an all new transmission.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        As it is, they had to modify the Carrera S engine to fit
        Who told you that? No they didn't. It already fits.

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        and the transmissions between the 911 and Cayman series are quite a bit different because the differentials turn in opposite directions.
        It's irrelevant. The PDK already mates up to the Boxster / Cayman chassis and the flat-6 bellhousing. It's all the same stuff that already works so why shouldn't it work now?

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        There may also be size considerations there as well.
        There aren't any.

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        So if the Cayman GTS PDK isn't rated for the torque output of the GT4 engine, which is likely, since Andreas said they had to use a torque limiter and a dual-mass flywheel for the manual, then they basically have to design an all new transmission.
        No. It's the same PDK unit capable of the same torque. I haven't read anything about it being a different PDK transmission other than layout changes. Plus the torque increase over the 3.4 is not some giant jump anyway and if the Carrera S PDK can take it the Cayman PDK can.
      1. andrew20195's Avatar
        andrew20195 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Who told you that? No they didn't. It already fits.
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...WojMMeg4#t=128

        Unless you think Andreas is outright lying... The 911 does have more vertical room in the engine compartment than the Cayman/Boxter, so there may have been changes to the induction system.



        No. It's the same PDK unit capable of the same torque. I haven't read anything about it being a different PDK transmission other than layout changes. Plus the torque increase over the 3.4 is not some giant jump anyway and if the Carrera S PDK can take it the Cayman PDK can.
        I did some research and you're correct on this. But the PDK is undoubtedly more expensive, and in that video I linked towards the end Andreas says PDK may appear in the future, but they need to make a market case for it.

        That being said, while enthusiasts are comfortable pushing the limits of their components, manufacturers definitely aren't, and the Germans in particular overengineer almost everything. Look at the BMW 335i. Those manual transmissions are only rated at 400 Nm, and I don't think anyone has broken one yet. That doesn't mean BMW is going to attach it to an engine that produced over 400 Nm
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...WojMMeg4#t=128

        Unless you think Andreas is outright lying... The 911 does have more vertical room in the engine compartment than the Cayman/Boxter, so there may have been changes to the induction system.
        That's a 20 minute video.

        Regardless, I don't need to watch it because the engines are the exact same size. The only difference between them is the bore. Everything else is exactly the same (obviously the cams change but they don't suddenly take up more space).

        So what difference does it make again?

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        I did some research and you're correct on this. But the PDK is undoubtedly more expensive, and in that video I linked towards the end Andreas says PDK may appear in the future, but they need to make a market case for it.
        They already made the case for it. They already developed it for the chassis. This is a political decision and not one of engineering or cost. The car would sell more with the PDK but it would stomp every 911 short of the GT3 and Turbo.
      1. andrew20195's Avatar
        andrew20195 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        That's a 20 minute video.
        Which is why I linked to the relevant part. After watching it again he said they needed to change the intake and even machine the engine casing to make it fit. ::shrug::
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        Which is why I linked to the relevant part. After watching it again he said they needed to change the intake and even machine the engine casing to make it fit. ::shrug::
        It started at the beginning for me? Tried it again same thing.

        What point in the video is it?

        I'm sure they need to make some minor intake change but the 3.4 and 3.8 are the same exact block, same stroke, use the same crank, etc. It's just different bore and pistons.

        Technically you could take a 3.4 Boxster with a PDK, bore the block, add these same pistons, and have what they are claiming you can't.

        It's just politics.
      1. andrew20195's Avatar
        andrew20195 -
        That's strange. The link should go to 2:08, where Andreas talks about the engine change.

        I'm not sure exactly what they are working with. My current knowledge of Porsche ends with the 997/987 generation. I do know that homebrew engine swaps are far more successful than anything a manufacturer would condone (for legal reasons). Also, consider the fact that the base GT4 is $14k cheaper than a Carerra S. Even if they are holding it back for internal political reasons, it's still a great value. And if one has the means to build the best 2WD Porsche, regardless of cost, I think the GT4 is a good starting point.
      1. DD GT3 RD's Avatar
        DD GT3 RD -
        If this was out I would of bought it. Its so sick. I test drove a Cayman GTS on a backroad and had so much fun, it just lacked power. The steering, the feel, the weight...it was just so fun I was giggling, I didn't think of my ZR1 when I was driving it.

        But ended up with this....

        Click here to enlarge

        Click here to enlarge
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        That's strange. The link should go to 2:08, where Andreas talks about the engine change.

        I'm not sure exactly what they are working with. My current knowledge of Porsche ends with the 997/987 generation. I do know that homebrew engine swaps are far more successful than anything a manufacturer would condone (for legal reasons). Also, consider the fact that the base GT4 is $14k cheaper than a Carerra S. Even if they are holding it back for internal political reasons, it's still a great value. And if one has the means to build the best 2WD Porsche, regardless of cost, I think the GT4 is a good starting point.
        I don't disagree.

        I just know it is politics and would love to see the Cayman be the best it can be.

        Honestly, since even the GT3 shares the same block we are closer than ever to a GT3 engine being plug and play in a Cayman/Boxster.

        Obviously Porsche could do it but they're scared of the ramifications.

        PDK at the very least would have been nice but at least they have exceeded a 911 in the lineup which says something.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DD GT3 RD Click here to enlarge
        If this was out I would of bought it. Its so sick. I test drove a Cayman GTS on a backroad and had so much fun, it just lacked power. The steering, the feel, the weight...it was just so fun I was giggling, I didn't think of my ZR1 when I was driving it.

        But ended up with this....

        http://www.PorscheBoost.com/images/i..._zps3w5b-1.jpg

        http://www.PorscheBoost.com/images/i..._zpsmbdi-1.jpg
        I think you did just fine.
      1. BlackJetE90OC's Avatar
        BlackJetE90OC -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Honestly, since even the GT3 shares the same block we are closer than ever to a GT3 engine being plug and play in a Cayman/Boxster.

        Obviously Porsche could do it but they're scared of the ramifications.
        The GT4 wouldn't $84k, if that were true.

        If they transferred everything over from the GT3, the GT4 would be well over $100k. That isn't the point of the car.

        PDK is coming, that has been hinted at numerous times.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by BlackJetE90OC Click here to enlarge
        The GT4 wouldn't $84k, if that were true.

        If they transferred everything over from the GT3, the GT4 would be well over $100k. That isn't the point of the car.

        PDK is coming, that has been hinted at numerous times.
        Come on how much of the pricing structure is artificial to create 'tiers' between the models?

        Would it be more expensive with the GT3 motor? Sure. It already has basically everything else though.

        Regardless, even if it did cost more how awesome would it be?