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    • The new 2020 Porsche 718 GT4 Boxster and Cayman models get a 4.0 liter naturally aspirated flat-6 based on the 9A2B6

      Finally! The new Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman GT4 street cars are officially here. They do indeed have naturally aspirated six-cylinder power but they do not share the GT3's powerplant which is a shame.


      Not that the 420 horsepower 4.0 liter flat-6 they are equipped with is a bad motor but it is based on the 9A2 architecture. Porsche essentially increased the displacement of the Carrera 3.0 flat-6 and dropped the turbos.

      The 9A2B4 the standard Cayman and Boxster come with is from this same engine family but a four-cylinder version obviously.

      Porsche did this to not upset GT3 owners and in a a somewhat interesting twist showed 991.2 Carrera, S, T, and GTS owners how much displacement is left on the table with their engine architecture.

      Porsche is revving the motor to 8k rpm and pairing it to a manual transmission only.

      Even if you are disappointed there is no PDK option or GT3 based engine, the GT4 models will be the best driver's cars for the money in the Porsche lineup.


      06/18/2019
      The 718 family welcomes new members: with the new 718 Spyder and the 718 Cayman GT4, Porsche introduces two particularly emotional and powerful top models to claim top spot in the model series.

      Their pure character will appeal to sports car enthusiasts who delight in unadulterated driving pleasure and appreciate a high level of agility and an almost intimate proximity to the centre of power. The perfectly balanced mid-engine concept offers all this. For the first time ever, the 718 Spyder and the 718 Cayman GT4 share a technical base. This includes the newly developed four-litre six-cylinder naturally aspirated engine, together with a six-speed manual transmission. The boxer engine generates 309 kW (420 PS; fuel consumption combined 10.9 l/100 km; CO2 emissions combined 249 g/km) in both models. Whilst the GT4 represents the entry-level GT road model from Porsche, the Spyder lends itself to all kinds of curves. Both rely on highly efficient aerodynamics, a full GT chassis and powerful brakes.

      High-revving and highly emotional naturally aspirated engine
      At the heart of both models is the new four-litre six-cylinder boxer engine. The naturally aspirated engine is based on the same engine family as the turbo engines in the current 911 Carrera model series. The new high-revving engine generates 309 kW (420 PS) – 35 PS more than in the GT4 predecessor models. The third generation of the Spyder even has 45 PS more. It delivers a maximum torque of 420 newton metres at between 5,000 and 6,800 rpm. The manual transmission sports cars can both break the 300 km/h barrier: the 718 Spyder has a top speed of 301 km/h, whilst the 718 Cayman GT4 can reach 304 km/h. Both models accelerate to 100 km/h in 4.4 seconds from a standing start. The correlated fuel consumption of the mid-engine sports cars is 10.9 l/100 km according to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). The fascinating character of this naturally aspirated engine combines a modern gasoline particulate filter emission control system with the linear power delivery and the immediate response of a GT engine. It has a maximum engine speed of 8,000 revolutions. The unparalleled boxer sound remains untouched. New additions include technical highlights such as adaptive cylinder control. In part-load operation, it temporarily interrupts the injection process in one of the two cylinder banks, thus reducing fuel consumption.

      Piezo injectors are used for direct fuel injection for the first time ever in a high-revving engine. They split each injection process into up to five individual injections. This supports a complete – and therefore emissions-friendly – combustion process. A variable intake system with two resonance valves ensures optimum gas exchange in the cylinders.

      Aerodynamic efficiency: more downforce, the same drag
      Among the striking features of the 718 Cayman GT4 is the comprehensively improved aerodynamics concept. It produces up to 50 percent more downforce, without adversely affecting drag – proof of outstanding efficiency. The aerodynamics of both models benefit enormously from the newly designed single-chamber arch rear silencer: it creates space in the rear section for a functional diffuser, which accounts for a good 30 percent of the downforce at the rear axle in the 718 Cayman GT4. The fixed rear wing is also marked by greater efficiency: it produces around 20 percent more downforce compared with its predecessor. This corresponds to an additional downforce of twelve kilograms at 200 km/h. The front section, which is optimised in the GT style, maintains the aerodynamic balance with a large front spoiler lip and so-called air curtains. The latter calm the air flow along the front wheels.

      Porsche 718 Spyder: an open-top road sport car with lightweight convertible top
      The new 718 Spyder is a pure machine for driving pleasure with a lightweight convertible top that can cope with top speeds. It continues the history of such famous Roadsters as the Porsche 550 Spyder and the 718 RS 60 Spyder. Open or closed, it thrills with a captivating silhouette. The roof is suitable for everyday use and can be stowed away under the boot lid in just a few steps. Unlike the GT4, the 718 Spyder has a rear spoiler that comes up automatically at 120 km/h. Thanks to the functional diffuser, it is the first model in the Boxster family to generate aerodynamic downforce at the rear axle.

      High-performance GT chassis: optimised for best dynamics
      For the first time ever, the 718 Spyder benefits from the high-performance GT chassis of the 718 Cayman GT4. With its superior cornering dynamics, it provides an emotional driving experience. Its further refined lightweight spring-strut front and rear axles make use of racing technologies. The direct connection to the chassis is partially by means of ball joints. The Porsche Active Suspension Management damping system with 30 mm lower suspension lowers the centre of gravity and improves lateral dynamics potential. It is specifically designed for use on the racetrack and makes the handling characteristics of the 718 Cayman GT4 sharper. The 718 Spyder also benefits from this design. The Porsche Stability Management (PSM) operates with even greater sensitivity and precision here but can optionally also be deactivated in two steps. Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) with mechanical rear differential lock further enhances the longitudinal and lateral dynamics, cornering performance and driving pleasure. The GT4 also comes with the option of a Clubsport package. This includes a rear steel roll bar, a hand-held fire extinguisher and a six-point seatbelt on the driver’s side.

      Gripping: powerful brakes, ultra-high-performance tyres
      The high-performance brake system in the 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 provides consistent braking that is suitable for track driving thanks to large aluminium monobloc fixed-calliper brakes. The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) is also available as an option. One new feature is that the 718 Spyder now runs on ultra-high-performance (UHP) tyres specially adapted by Porsche. They are part of the overall package that makes the 718 Cayman GT4 fly on the Nürburgring “Nordschleife”: its lap time on the 20.6-kilometre classic racetrack is more than ten seconds faster than its predecessor.

      The new Porsche 718 Spyder and the 718 Cayman GT4 are available to order now.






      This article was originally published in forum thread: The new 2020 Porsche 718 GT4 Boxster and Cayman models get a 4.0 liter naturally aspirated flat-6 based on the 9A2B6 started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 14 Comments
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Anyone else already thinking about getting these heads on their Carrera? I'll take 8k rpm...
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Anyone else already thinking about getting these heads on their Carrera? I'll take 8k rpm...
        Probably won't fit with the extra bore the GT4 has.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        Probably won't fit with the extra bore the GT4 has.
        No reason you can't bore the 3.0 to the same spec.
      1. axthomson's Avatar
        axthomson -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        No reason you can't bore the 3.0 to the same spec.
        It will be interesting to see where this goes power wise. I am hoping they do a touring version of the GT4, but I doubt it.
      1. F16HTON's Avatar
        F16HTON -
        No reason why you cannot just do a Ferrea upgrade and rev 9K. Rod bolts may need upgrade too.
      1. SpeedLimit?'s Avatar
        SpeedLimit? -
        I definitely like that Porsche went this direction for the engine more than the last gt4 and spider. Better performance and less of the "parts bin" feel.
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by F16HTON Click here to enlarge
        No reason why you cannot just do a Ferrea upgrade and rev 9K. Rod bolts may need upgrade too.
        Easier than sourcing these heads for sure. I just want to know the bore and stroke.

        We can get to 3.8 liters using the 718 S bore while keeping our stroke as is. It's kind of amazing how much displacement we have left on the table..
      1. Stevenh's Avatar
        Stevenh -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky2 Click here to enlarge
        Easier than sourcing these heads for sure. I just want to know the bore and stroke.

        We can get to 3.8 liters using the 718 S bore while keeping our stroke as is. It's kind of amazing how much displacement we have left on the table..
        I feel you you would have just been better off starting with the Turbo before you get to this level modding the car.
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Stevenh Click here to enlarge
        I feel you you would have just been better off starting with the Turbo before you get to this level modding the car.
        If I'm approaching $200k my money is going to McLaren and not Porsche.

        The 911 Carrera is just as capable of a mod platform as the 911 Turbo for far less money.
      1. Stevenh's Avatar
        Stevenh -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky2 Click here to enlarge
        The 911 Carrera is just as capable of a mod platform as the 911 Turbo for far less money.
        I hear you. I'm just saying by the time you swap heads, build a short block, fuel system, clutches, turbos, etc you'd have been better off just buying the 911TT finding some bolt-on turbos and not losing 90% of the cash you put into mods when you go to sell the thing.
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Stevenh Click here to enlarge
        I hear you. I'm just saying by the time you swap heads, build a short block, fuel system, clutches, turbos, etc you'd have been better off just buying the 911TT finding some bolt-on turbos and not losing 90% of the cash you put into mods when you go to sell the thing.
        You have to do the same fuel system and PDK upgrades on either.

        What advantage does the Turbo have? It also doesn't hold its value well.

        I don't have to do the heads or build the block I just have the option to. It's nice to be sitting on an extra liter through bore and not stroke should I want to build the motor.
      1. Stevenh's Avatar
        Stevenh -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky2 Click here to enlarge
        You have to do the same fuel system and PDK upgrades on either.

        What advantage does the Turbo have? It also doesn't hold its value well.

        I don't have to do the heads or build the block I just have the option to. It's nice to be sitting on an extra liter through bore and not stroke should I want to build the motor.
        Thats fair. I don't know the limits of either car's fuel system or transmission to be honest.

        My point is that it oftentimes makes the most sense to pony up and start with the car closer to your power goals when you look at the long term economics, particularly resale, of modding and owning a car. If you assume you only get ~20% of mod money back and the car depreciates at ~10% year the numbers will tell you to go with the more expensive car for moderate power levels. If you're planning to build to the limit and go for crazy power then you will be best off starting with the cheapest entry point for the platform.
      1. subaru335i's Avatar
        subaru335i -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Stevenh Click here to enlarge
        Thats fair. I don't know the limits of either car's fuel system or transmission to be honest.

        My point is that it oftentimes makes the most sense to pony up and start with the car closer to your power goals when you look at the long term economics, particularly resale, of modding and owning a car. If you assume you only get ~20% of mod money back and the car depreciates at ~10% year the numbers will tell you to go with the more expensive car for moderate power levels. If you're planning to build to the limit and go for crazy power then you will be best off starting with the cheapest entry point for the platform.
        So true. I have decided to be happy with relatively simple bolt ons for the best bang/buck and resale value if you want to keep the car daily-able and nice and comfortable. Which means getting a car that has the most amount of power stock that your budget allows so you can get a decent amount more with little work.


        Going "all out" drag car always devolves into foxbody shell with a billion horespower lol.
      1. alcuin's Avatar
        alcuin -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky2 Click here to enlarge
        If I'm approaching $200k my money is going to McLaren and not Porsche.

        The 911 Carrera is just as capable of a mod platform as the 911 Turbo for far less money.
        one of the things I like the most in my Targa GTS is the way it revs at high rpms.

        having punch till 7.5k is really nice.

        the way it revs makes me feel it can do it to 8k without the need of cams.

        500hp at 8k would be Click here to enlarge

        my engine has now 55.000km in 1.5 years.